We traveled from East to West to East across Florida this month. Although, traveling coast to coast is only a 3 hr drive in this part of the country, it still is a different world from our home base. This month we had the Diamond Shield removed from the MH and it looks great. Diamond Shield is one of those options that sound good, but don't work as designed.  After 10 years of exposure to the elements, the front of our MH was looking bad due to deterioration of the product that is supposed to protect it.  Fortunately, the original paint underweight was in great condition so now we are back to looking smart in the front.

We now stayed in many FL state parks with great success.  Unlike other states, their policies are MH friendly and the camping spots are very nice.  We've now stayed within a short distance of the ocean on both coasts and in the middle with great success.  Reservations are necessary, but we've been able to reserve spots about 6 weeks out, in most cases.

We also share some ideas about the future of working on the road in an RV plus lots of interesting stories of life on the road.  The end of the month finds us in Jupiter FL.  From here we head back to our winter headquarters in Titusville.  Next month we'll be at home in IL for the summer months.

April, 2021

Episode 192 Web links 

RV Navigator Episode 192

A Bi-Coastal Month

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RV set up for the mobile office for working while on the road

Diamond Shield is removed by the guys from UglyShield.  Above is the before (dull /mould), below is the f paint underneath all shinned up.

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Below (click on pix for article)

RV driver annihilates their new Jeep.

In case you can't discern what you're looking at, that's the Jeep's 3.6-liter V6 as seen from below. And before you ask, no, the oil pan wasn't delicately removed to show the internals—it was peeled back like a can of sardines when the transfer case quite literally exploded.